Citizenship Services

Welcome to the Passport & Citizenship Unit of the U.S. Embassy Ankara. We provide services for United States Citizens resident in Turkey.  We provide the following routine and emergency services and information: passport issuance and renewals, reports of birth abroad, notarial services, information for travelers, death of an U.S. Citizen abroad, voter assistance, living in Turkey, how to protect yourself from various types of scams and emergency services for U.S. citizens.

We provide service between 13:00 and 16:00 Monday through Thursday.  You need to make an online appointment before your visit: Online Appointment System

We are open for appointments Monday to Friday mornings. The Unit is closed to the public on U.S. and Turkish Public Holidays.

Please note: There is no walk-in service for United States citizens who require a service related to passports, citizenship or birth registration. These services are by appointment only.

What Service Do You Require?

If you are a U.S. citizen and the parent of a child born out of the United States, you can document your child’s U.S. citizenship with a Consular Report of Birth Abroad. Please follow this link to see if you can transmit the U.S. citizenship through U.S. Citizen Services.

 

If you are over the age of 18, were born to a U.S. citizen parent or parents, and believe that you have a claim to U.S. citizenship, please review this website for more information on U.S. nationality law.

Renunciation is the most unequivocal way in which a person can manifest an intention to relinquish U.S. citizenship. Please consider the effects of renouncing U.S. citizenship, described below, before taking this serious and irrevocable action.

To renounce U.S. citizenship, you must voluntarily and with intent to relinquish U.S. citizenship:

  • appear in person before a U.S. consular or diplomatic officer in a foreign country (normally at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate)
  • sign an oath of renunciation
  • pay a $2,350.00 fee

Americans cannot effectively renounce their citizenship by mail, through an agent, or while in the United States because of the provisions of section 349(a) (5) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. Renunciations that do not meet the conditions described above have no legal effect. In fact, U.S. courts have held certain attempts to renounce U.S. citizenship to be ineffective on a variety of grounds, as discussed below.

Renouncing all rights and privileges

A person who wants to renounce U.S. citizenship cannot decide to retain some of the privileges of citizenship, as this would be logically inconsistent with the concept of renunciation. A person who attempts to retain some rights lacks a full understanding of renouncing citizenship and/or lacks the necessary intent to renounce citizenship. The Department of State will not approve a loss of citizenship in such instances.

Dual nationality / statelessness

If you renounce your U.S. citizenship and do not already possess a foreign nationality, you may be rendered stateless and, thus, lack the protection of any government. You may also have difficulty traveling as you may not be entitled to a passport from any country. Even if you are not stateless, you would still be required to obtain a visa to travel to the United States, or show that you are eligible for admission pursuant to the terms of the Visa Waiver Pilot Program (VWPP). You could be barred from entering the United States if found ineligible for a visa or the VWPP, under certain circumstances. Nonetheless, renunciation of U.S. citizenship may not prevent a foreign country from deporting an individual back to the United States, in some non-citizen status.

Tax & military obligations /no escape from prosecution

Also, renouncing your U.S. citizenship may have no impact whatsoever on your U.S. tax or military service obligations. (Contact the Internal Revenue Service or U.S. Selective Service for more information). In addition, the act of renouncing U.S. citizenship will not allow you to avoid possible prosecution for crimes which you may have committed in the United States, or escape the repayment of financial obligations previously incurred in the United States or incurred as United States citizens abroad.

Renunciation for Minor Children

Parents cannot renounce U.S. citizenship on behalf of their minor children. Before an oath of renunciation will be administered under Section 349(a) (5) of the INA, a person under the age of eighteen must convince a U.S. diplomatic or consular officer that he/she fully understands the nature and consequences of the oath of renunciation, is not subject to duress or undue influence, and is voluntarily seeking to renounce his/her U.S. citizenship.

Irrevocability of Renunciation

Finally, renouncing U.S. citizenship is irrevocable and cannot be canceled or set aside without successful administrative or judicial appeal. An applicant who renounced his or her U.S. citizenship before the age of eighteen can have that citizenship reinstated if he or she makes that desire known to the Department of State within six months after attaining the age of eighteen.

Where can I find more information about renunciation?

U.S. citizens traveling or residing in Turkey are subject to Turkish laws

Turkish-U.S. dual nationals may also be subject to additional laws that impose special obligations on Turkish citizens. Before traveling to Turkey, Turkish-U.S. dual nationals and U.S. citizens of Turkish origin or ancestry are strongly advised to check with the nearest Turkish Embassy or Consulate for special laws that may apply.

Dual nationality, the simultaneous possession of two citizenships, is possible because there are no uniform rules of international law relating to the acquisition of nationality. Each country has its own laws regarding nationality, and its nationality is conferred upon individuals on the basis of its own independent domestic policy. Individuals may have dual nationality by choice or by automatic operation of these different and sometimes conflicting laws.

The laws of Turkey provide for acquisition of Turkish citizenship based on one’s descent–by birth to a Turkish citizen parent or parents in Turkey and also by birth abroad to a Turkish citizen parent or parents — regardless of the other nationalities a person might acquire at birth. Children born in Turkey of U.S. citizen parents do not have a claim to Turkish citizenship unless one of the parents is a Turkish citizen. The automatic acquisition or retention of a foreign nationality does not affect Turkish citizenship nor does the automatic acquisition of Turkish nationality affect U.S. citizenship. Turkish laws do not contain any provisions requiring citizens who are born with dual nationality to choose one nationality or the other when they become adults.

When a child acquires Turkish citizenship, the parents are expected to register the birth with the Nufus Mudurlugu (Vital Statistics Office) having jurisdiction over the place where the birth occurred. Children born abroad to Turkish parents should be registered with the Turkish Embassy or Consulate having jurisdiction over the place of birth. The Turkish Consulate forwards such registrations to appropriate “nufus” office through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Those neglecting to register abroad may encounter difficulties making the appropriate registration when they return to Turkey.

Naturalization and loss of Turkish citizenship is controlled by the “Nufus ve Vatandaslik Isleri Genel Mudurlugu (Vital Statistics Office), a department of the Ministry of Interior, and is located at Camlica Mahallesi, 1. Ciftlik Caddesi No. 136, Lalegul, Demetevler, Ankara, telephone number (0312) 591-2100 or 591-2166. This Directorate has offices throughout Turkey.

While recognizing the existence of dual nationality and permitting Turkish citizens to have other nationalities, the Turkish Government requires that those who apply for another nationality inform appropriate Turkish officials (nearest Turkish Embassy or Consulate abroad) along with the original Naturalization Certificate, Turkish birth certificate, document showing completion of military service (for males), marriage certificate (if applicable), and four photographs.

Claims of other countries upon dual national U.S. citizens often place them in situations where their obligations to one country are in conflict with the other. It is generally considered that while dual nationals are in the other country, of which they are citizens, that country has a predominant claim on them. In addition, their dual nationality may hamper efforts to provide diplomatic and consular protection to them when they are abroad. For instance, the Government of Turkey will not permit any Turkish-American dual national arrested in Turkey to contact American officials.

Like Americans who possess only U.S. citizenship, dual national U.S. citizens owe allegiance to the United States and are obligated to obey its laws and regulations. Such persons usually have certain obligations to Turkey as well. Although failure to fulfill such obligations may have no adverse effect on dual nationals while in the United States, dual nationals might be forced to comply with those obligations or pay a penalty if they return to Turkey. For instance, visiting male U.S. citizens over the age of 18 who are also considered to be Turkish citizens are likely subject to conscription and compulsory military service upon arrival, and to other aspects of Turkish law while in Turkey. In cases where dual Turkey-U.S. nationals encounter difficulty in Turkey, the ability of the U.S. Embassy to provide assistance may be quite limited, since Turkey does not recognize a dual national’s claim to U.S. citizenship.

Turkish-American dual nationals are required to use a U.S. passport to enter and leave the U.S. Likewise, Turkish officials expect you to enter and leave Turkey on a Turkish passport. Use of both passports does not endanger either citizenship.

Applying for a U.S. passport abroad is a different process from applying for one in the United States. The application forms, required documentation, and costs are the same, but expedited services are not available.